Port Jackson ‘Sydney Harbour’

Port Jackson, containing Sydney Harbour, is the natural harbour of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The harbour is an inlet of the South Pacific Ocean. Widely considered to be one of the world’s finest harbours, it is known for its beauty, and in particular, as the location of the Sydney Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge which connects central Sydney with the Northern Suburbs region.

Sydney Harbour Bridge

Photographed above are some of Port Jacksons ‘Sydney Harbours’ famous icons. From left to right:

‘Sydney’s Luna Park’  – an amusement park steeped in history and controversy. First opened in 1935 at the foot of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and ran for nine-month seasons until 1972, when it was opened year-round. Luna Park was closed in mid-1979, immediately following the Ghost Train fire, which killed six children and one adult. Most of the park was demolished, and a new amusement park was constructed; this originally operated under the name of Harbourside Amusement Park before resuming the Luna Park name. The park was closed again in 1988 as an independent engineering inspection determined that several rides needed urgent repair. The owners failed to repair and reopen the park before a New South Wales government deadline, and ownership was passed to a new body. Reopening in 1995, Luna Park closed again after thirteen months because of the Big Dipper rollercoaster: noise pollution complaints from residents on the clifftop above the park caused the ride’s operating hours to be heavily restricted, and the resultant drop in attendance made the park unprofitable. After another redevelopment, Luna Park reopened in 2004 and has continued operating since.

‘Sydney Harbour Bridge’ – a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. It opened in 1932, the bridge’s design was influenced by the Hell Gate Bridge in New York. It is the sixth longest spanning-arch bridge in the world, and it is the tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 134 metres (440 ft) from top to water level.

‘Sydney Opera House’ – a multi-venue performing arts centre, opened in 1973 and was designed by and primarily built under the auspices of Danish architect Jørn Utzon, after a gestation period that begin with Utzon’s selection in a 1957 international design competition. opened in 1973 and was designed by and primarily built under the auspices of Danish architect Jørn Utzon, after a gestation period that begin with Utzon’s selection in a 1957 international design competition. The NSW Government, led by Premier Joseph Cahill gave the go-ahead for work to begin in 1958. Though its name suggests a single venue, the project comprises multiple performance venues which together are among the busiest performing arts centres in the world — hosting over 1,500 performances each year attended by some 1.2 million people. The venues produce and present a wide range of in-house productions and accommodate numerous performing arts companies, including the four key resident companies Opera Australia, The Australian Ballet, the Sydney Theatre Company and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. As one of the most popular visitor attractions in Australia, more than seven million people visit the site each year, with 300,000 people participating annually in a guided tour of the facility.

Notes and referrences:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Jackson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luna_Park_Sydney

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Harbour_Bridge

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Opera_House

This entry was posted in Cityscapes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , .

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*